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Apple U-Pick Orchards in Northeastern Missouri in 2022, by county

Below are the U-Pick orchards and farms for apples that we know of in this area. Not all areas of any state, nor even every state, have apples orchards that are open to the public. If you know of any others, please tell us using the add a farm form!

Audrain County

  • Hickory Ridge Orchard - apples, pumpkins, Honey from hives on the farm, Fresh eggs, gift shop, concessions \\/ refreshment stand, porta-potties, picnic area, picnic area you may bring your own food, face painting, petting zoo, farm animals, birthday parties, weddings and wedding parties, school tours, group reservations
    24688 Audrain Road 820, Mexico, MO 65265. Phone: (573) 721-1415. Email: [email protected]. Open: Monday and Wednesday, Closed; Tuesday and Thursday to Saturday, from 10am to 6pm; Sunday, from 12pm to 6pm, August 1 to September 15; Monday to Saturday, 10am to 6pm; Sunday, 12pm to 6pm, September 15 to October 31. Directions: . Click here for a map and directions. Payment: Cash, Check, Debit cards, Visa, MasterCard, Discover, AmEx.
    Hickory Ridge Orchard Facebook page. . . (ADDED: February 16, 2018)

Lewis County

  • Blue Heron Orchard - ORGANIC, apples, Cider mill fresh apple cider made on the premises, prepicked produce, school tours
    32974 220th Street, Canton, MO 63435. Phone: 573-655-4291. Email: [email protected]. Open: Sundays 12:00 pm until 4:00 pm Saturdays 9:00 am until 4:00 pm Wednesday, Thursday and Fridays 10:00 am until 5:00 pm By appointment also. Directions: From Quincy, Illinois: Highway 24 West to US 61 North. Exit Highway C at La Grange, Missouri, turn right (east). Come into La Grange turn left at junction B, and go 2.3 miles (North). Turn Left at Road 220. (Look for Red Apple signs on right.) Go .7 miles, Blue Heron Orchard on Left. Click here for a map and directions. Payment: Cash, Check. . . click here for picking updates. Crops are usually available in August, September, October. The main harvest begins in late August with Gala Apples and continues through mid to late October with Wine Saps. We are certified organic for all crops! Heirloom Tomatoes, Peppers, Squash: summer/winter, Basil. Spring has arrived! Early cool crops are producing. We have 18 different varieties of Tomatoes started. Most other crops will be ready in end of June. Remember: Call ahead!
    Comments from a visitor on August 03, 2012: "Loved it, very friendly people. "

Macon County

  • West Orchards - apples, peaches, plums, Honey from hives on the farm, Cider mill fresh apple cider made on the premises, U-pick and already picked, snacks and refreshment stand, restrooms, picnic area
    25875 Jewell Avenue, Macon, MO 63552. Phone: 660-651-7582. Email: [email protected]. Open: See our Website for current hours. Directions: From Macon Missouri go 5 miles north on highway 63 , turn left (west) on AX (Axtell) , go 3/4 mile , turn south on Jewell , 3/4 mile to Orchard. . Click here for a map and directions. Payment: Cash, Check. . Alternate Phone: 660-385-3750. . Picking updates: click here for picking updates. Apples: August 1st to October 15th. We have 17 varieties of apples including , Pristene (our 1st summer apple and super eating as well as applesauce apple) , Mutsu Crispin , Arkansas Black , Jonagold, Honeycrisp , Rome Beauty , Stamared (Winesap variety) Jonafree (very close to the old fashion Jonathon) , Senshu , Redfree , Gala , Liberty and more. Our objective is to provide wholesome low spray fruit that taste great! Come on out to the orchard. For a small fee, We do tours for local groups from Senior Citizens , Pre-School to Kindergarten through High School. We are a U-Pick orchard and love to have families and individuals come out to pick their own fresh fruit! Orchard Opens around the 1st of August with our 1st apples variety being the sprightly tasting and beautiful apple, The "Pristine". We also will have at that time plums and some peaches if the season is good.

Apple picking tips:

Apples ripen from the outside of the tree towards the center, so the apples out the outside of the tree will ripen first.  Once they are picked, they stop ripening. Picking apples directly from a tree is easy. Roll the apple upwards off the branch and give a little twist; don't pull straight away from the tree. If two apples are joined together at the top, both will come away at the same time. Don't shake the trees or branches.  If the apple you are trying to pick drops, (or others on the tree) go ahead and pick it up. They're perfectly fine! But do wash them before you eat them! More info: How to tell when apples are ripe

  • Once picked, don't throw the apples into the baskets, place them in gently, or they will bruise and go bad more quickly.
  • Don't wash apples until just before using to prevent spoilage.
  • For an explanation of why apple slices turn brown and how to stop it, see this page!
  • Keep apples cool after picking to increase shelf life.  A cool basement is ideal, but the fruit/vegetable drawer of a refrigerator will work, too.  A refrigerator is fine for small quantities of apples. Boxed apples need to be kept in a cool, dark spot where they won't freeze. Freezing ruptures all of an apple's cells, turning it into one large bruise overnight. The usual solution is to store apples in a root cellar. But root cellars often have potatoes in them: apples and potatoes should never be stored in the same room because, as they age, potatoes release an otherwise ethylene gas, which makes apples spoil faster. If you can keep the gas away from your apples, they will keep just fine. Just don't store them right next to potatoes.
    Prevent contact between apples stored for the winter by wrapping them individually in sheets of newspaper. The easiest way to do this is to unfold a section of newspaper all the way and tear it into quarters. Then stack the wrapped apples . See more here: How to store apples at home
  • Apples don't improve or "ripen" after being picked - this is an urban myth - see this page for the truth - with references!

Which apple variety is best?

There are tens of thousands of varieties of apples, developed over centuries. They vary in sugar, acoidity, flavors, storing, crispness and many other attributes. See our guides to apple varieties:

Canning apples - fully illustrated, with step-by-step instructions

Recipes, illustrated with step by step instructions

Using fresh apples and miscellaneous

 

Other Local Farm Products (Honey, Horses, Milk, Meat, Eggs, Etc.)
(NOT pick-your-own, unless they are also listed above)


Above is the
2020 version of
the Ball Blue Book