2017 U.S. Apple Crop Facts

This month's notes: September 2017: Stored US apples are still  available.  See your state's crop availability calendar for more specific dates of upcoming crops.

Valentine's Day - February 14 - See this website for Valentines Day history, facts and Amazon's top picks for fast, easy, inexpensive gifts for the man, woman or children in your life!

Easter will be April 16, 2017 - if you want to take your children to a free Easter egg hunt - see our companion website to find a local Easter Egg hunt!

And we have home canning, preserving, drying and freezing directions. You can access recipes and other resources from the drop down menus at the top of the page or the site search. If you have any questions or suggestions, feel free to write me! Also make your own ice cream; see How to make ice cream and ice cream making equipment and manuals. Have fun, eat healthier and better tasting, and save money by picking your own locally grown fruit and vegetables, and then using our easy  directions

Please tell the farms you found them here - and ask them to update their information!!

Subscribe to our: Email alerts Follow us on Twitter  Add this page to your favorites! - Email this page to a friend, or to yourself


2017 U.S. Apple Crop Facts

Apples are one of the easiest fruit to pick and use.  They're big, not easily bruised, most varieties store well, they can be eaten fresh, cooked, canned, frozen and made into many tasty and healthy dishes. Apples are fat-free, low sodium, and cholesterol-free. A bushel weighs between 42 and 48 lbs. A medium apple has about 80 calories. Apples originated in the Middle East (in an area between the Caspin and the Black Sea) more than 4000 years ago! They were the favorite fruit of ancient Greeks and Romans. Apples arrived in England at around the time of the Norman conquest (in 1066) and English settlers brought them to America in the 1600 and 1700's.  Only the crabapple is native to North America. Johnny Appleseed did really exist; his name was John Chapman, and he was born on September 26,1774 near Leominster, Massachusetts.  (For more about Johnny Appleseed, see this page!)

Current Season (2017) Apple Crop Data and Facts

How big will this year's crop be?  It depends upon who you ask, but they're all close, and agree this year will be larger than past years, maybe a record. The U.S. Apple Association's estimate of the size of the 2014 United States apple crop is 263.8 million bushels. The USDA's August 12th estimate was for 259.2 million bushels. That would be a 6% increase over the 2013 crop (which was 248.6 million bushels), and a 16 percent increase over the five-year average (227.7 million bushels).

If the estimates hold, 2014 will produce the third-largest crop in U.S. history (the top crop - 277.2 million bushels - was in 1998).

Previous Year's Apple Crop Figures

Fruit Grower News reported that the US Apple Association announced that the 2013 U.S. apple crop was about 248.6 million bushels (the August 2013 forecast was for 243 million bushels).  That's a 15 percent increase over 2012's final crop of 215 million bushels, and a 11 percent increase over the five-year average (224 million bushels). It's the largest crop since 2004, according to USDA numbers. The price range for apples wholesale (such as at large real farm markets and at orchards) was between $15 to $30 per bushel, depending upon the variety and location. Popular varieties, like Gala, Fuji, Honeycrisp, etc. were around $22 - $26/bushel (wholesale).

Who are the top apple producers?

The PeopleĀ“s Republic of China now produces the largest amount of apples, followed by the United States, Poland, Italy and France, in order. Apples are grown in almost every state, but since apples cannot set fruit and produce a viable crop unless they get enough total hours of cold each winter, warm winter states like Florida and warm areas of Texas, etc. do not produce commercial crops.  That leaves about 32 states  growing apples commercially. The top ten apple producing states, in order, are:

  1. Washington
  2. New York
  3. Michigan
  4. Pennsylvania
  5. California
  6. Virginia
  7. North Carolina
  8. Oregon
  9. Ohio
  10. Idaho

Apple seasons

Fresh apples appear in grocery stores all year round now, thanks to a global marketplace, but the northern hemisphere's apple season is typically from as early as July to as late as November.  The peak of the apple season is September and October.

So where do apple come from the rest of the year? Some (not all) varieties of apples store very well, and will keep for months in storage warehouses that maintain th eproper temperature and humidity.  That extends the season until 6 months later (March / April) when apples from the southern hemisphere are in season.  Which means that from March to July fresh apples in U.S. grocery stores come from the southern hemisphere, mostly from Chile and New Zealand. That accounts for about 6% of annual U.S. apple consumption according to the U.S. Apple organization.

Favorite varieties and uses for apples

Two-thirds of the U.S. crop is eaten fresh and one-third goes to processed uses (apple juice, applesauce, apple butter, packaged apple slices, etc.) Apple varieties change over time.  Red Delicious is still the most grown apple, making up most of the U.S. apple crop, but as consumer tastes shift, apple growers adapt their orchards, but trimming the trees down to a main trunk and several large branches, and then grafting growing tips of the new variety into those remaining branches. This allows growers to quickly (within 2 years) produce the new variety to meet consumer demand.

An example of this is Honeycrisp which has gained popularity on the traditional #1, Red Delicious. The top ten apple varieties currently grown in the United States are:

  1. Red Delicious
  2. Gala
  3. Golden Delicious
  4. Fuji
  5. Granny Smith
  6. McIntosh
  7. Honeycrisp
  8. Rome
  9. Empire
  10. Cripps Pink

Canning apples - fully illustrated, with step-by-step instructions

Recipes, illustrated with step by step instructions

Want to Grow Your Own Apples? 

I do and it's easy and fast.  Apple trees I planted in my yard two years ago are bearing several dozen fruit each this year!  Here's a guide to selecting a variety to grow and how!

Looking for Apple Cider?

And a fun tour? Check out Cider Mills.com!  They list the cider mills where you can go for a tour (and tasting!  yum!)


Other Apple Facts and Fun!

  • 2500 varieties of apples are grown in the United States.
  • 7500 varieties of apples are grown throughout the world.
  • About 100 different varieties of apples are grown commercially in the United States.
  • A bushel of apples typically weighs between 42 and 48 lbs.
  • Apples are grown commercially in 36 states.
  • Apples are grown in all 50 states.
  • Europeans eat about 46 pounds of apples annually.
  • United States consumers ate an average of 45.2 pounds of fresh apples and processed apple products. That's a lot of applesauce!
  • 61 percent of United States apples are eaten as fresh fruit.
  • 39 percent of apples are processed into apple products; 21 percent of this is for juice and cider.
  • The top apple producing states are Washington, New York, Michigan, California, Pennsylvania and Virginia, which produced over 83 percent of the nation's 2001-crop apple supply.
  • Apples are a great source of the fiber pectin. One apple has five grams of fiber.
  • In 2001 there were 8,000 apple growers with orchards covering 430,200 acres. (don't know how many of those are PYO).
  • The pilgrims planted the first United States apple trees in the Massachusetts Bay Colony.
  • Apple trees take four to five years to produce their first fruit, but you normally buy 2 or 3 year plants at the nursery, so it's only 2 years till they produce!
  • Most apples are still picked by hand in the fall.
  • Did you know you can carve an apple to make a doll?  Weird, but true and they look neat!  See this website for how to make one yourself!
  • Apple varieties range in size from a little larger than a cherry to as large as a grapefruit.
  • In Europe, France, Italy and Germany are the leading apple producing countries.
  • Apples are a member of the rose family.
  • Apples harvested from an average tree can fill 20 bushel boxes that weigh 42 pounds each.
  • 25 percent of an apple's volume is air. That is why they float.
  • It takes the energy from 50 leaves to produce one apple.
  • Apples are the second most valuable fruit grown in the United States. Oranges are first.
  • In colonial time apples were called winter banana or melt-in-the-mouth.
  • China is the leading producer of apples with over 1.2 billion bushels grown in 2001. The U.S. is number 2 .
  • Newton Pippin apples were the first apples exported from America in 1768, some were sent to Benjamin Franklin in London.
  • One of George Washington's hobbies was pruning his apple trees.
  • America's longest-lived apple tree was reportedly planted in 1647 by Peter Stuyvesant in his Manhattan orchard and was still bearing fruit when a derailed train struck it in 1866.
  • A bushel of apples weights about 42 pounds (up to 48 lbs) and will yield 12 to 15 quarts of applesauce.
  • It takes about 36 apples to create one gallon of apple cider.
  • And the many apple associations listed on this page have more facts and resources

Weights and Approximate Typical Processed Yields of Apples

 If you have this much fresh apples:

 You should get this much...

Commonly made products

 Canned or frozen (quarts)
 Canned or frozen (pints)
1 bushel 
(42-48 lbs)
1 bushel = 12 to 15 qt. canned applesauce (no sugar added), 14 - 18 with sugar

1 bushel = 10 to 12 qt. juice

12 - 16 quarts
28 - 36 pints
 3 lbs.
1 quart applesauce
1 quart
2 pints 
8 medium apples = 2.25 lbs 1 nine-inch apple pie 
or
3 cups of applesauce
1 peck = 10 to 14 lbs

 


Apple Festivals

Here is a list of major apple festivals in the U.S., Britain, Australia and other countries. If you know of any more, please write me! Feedback

 


This page was updated on

Picking Tips

[General picking tips and a guide to each fruit and vegetable] [How much do I need to pick? (Yields - how much raw makes how much cooked or frozen)] [Selecting the right varieties to pick] [All about apple varieties - which to pick and why!]  [Picking tips for Vegetables] [ Strawberry picking tips] [ Blueberries picking tips]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Illustrated Canning, Freezing, Jam Instructions and Recipes

All About Home Canning, Freezing and Making Jams, Pickles, Sauces, etc. ] [FAQs - Answers to common questions and problems] [Recommended books about home canning, jam making, drying and preserving!] [Free canning publications to download and print]

Home Canning Kits

Features:

Ball Enamel Waterbath Canner, Including Chrome-Plated Rack and 4-Piece Utensil Set

* All the tools you need for hot waterbath canning - in one comprehensive set!
* Complete with 21 1/2 qt. enameled waterbath canner
* Also includes canning rack, funnel, jar lifter, jar wrencher, bubble freer, tongs and lid lifter.
* A Kitchen Krafts exclusive collection.

This is the same type of standard canner that my grandmother used to make everything from applesauce to jams and jellies to tomato and spaghetti sauce. This complete kit includes everything you need and lasts for years: the canner, jar rack, jar grabber tongs, lid lifting wand, a plastic funnel, labels, bubble freer. It's much cheaper than buying the items separately. You'll never need anything else except jars & lids (and the jars are reusable)! There is also a simple kit with just the canner and rack, and a pressure canner, if you want to do vegetables (other than tomatoes). To see more canners, of different styles, makes and prices, click here!
Don't forget the Ball Blue Book!

Lids, Rings, Jars, mixes, pectin, etc.

Need lids, rings and replacement jars?  Or pectin to make jam, spaghetti sauce or salsa mix or pickle mixes?  Get them all here, and usually at lower prices than your local store!

Get them all here at the best prices on the internet!