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What's in season in September 2021, and other timely information:

Florida Citrus Harvest Calendar

Harvest Dates and Availability of Citrus in Florida

Oranges Grapefruit Tangerines/ Tangelos Lemons Limes
Orange are in season from autumn until spring and include Navel oranges, Temple oranges and Valencia oranges. The Valencia orange is considered to be the best juice orange in the world, accounting for more than half the production of oranges grown. Other oranges include Ambersweet, Hamlin, Pineapple, and Red Navel oranges. Specialty fruit such as tangelos, are available from November to February, and tangerines and grapefruit are available throughout the season.
Oranges: The most commonly-grown varieties of Florida oranges are Navel, Hamlin, Pineapple, Ambersweet and Valencia. The fresh orange season typically runs from October through June. Most oranges in Florida are grown in the southern two-thirds of the state where freezes are rare. However, Polk County near Tampa in the Central part of the state remains the top citrus producing county.
Grapefruit: The most commonly grown varieties of Florida grapefruit are Ruby Red, Flame, Thompson, Marsh and Duncan. The fresh grapefruit season typically runs from September through June.  More information about Florida citrus varieties.
Citrus should not picked until it has reached maturity because it does it ripen further after picking.

Available Description September October November December January February March April May
Fallglo
Tangerine
Mild taste, sweet and juicy                     
Robinson Tangerine Rich, sweet flavor with few seeds                  
Meyers Lemon Sweet for a lemon                    
Satsuma Sweet, no seeds                     
Red Navel
Oranges
Red flesh, rich sweet flavor                    
Hamlin
Orange
Excellent juice orange                     
Ambersweet Orange Very sweet, usually seedless                    
Navel Oranges Peels and sections very easily                     
Orlando
Tangelo
Peels easily, very juicy                    
Sunburst Tangerine Bright, orange color, rich flavor                     
Flame
Grapefruit
Red flesh, usually seedless                    
Star Ruby  Grapefruit Dark red, sweet grapefruit                    
Ruby Red
Grapefruit
Sweet pink grapefruit                    
White
Grapefruit
Tart white grapefruit
Key lime Sweet, flavorful lime, known for pies                    
Orlando
Tangelo
Peels easily, very juicy                    
Sunburst Tangerines Bright, orange color, rich flavor                    
Dancy Tangerine Rich, sweet flavor with spicy aroma                    
Pineapple Orange Acclaimed for juicy sweetness                    
Clementine Tangelo                      
Minneola Tangelo Deep orange to red-orange color                    
Honeybell taneglos also called Minneola, Deep orange to red-orange color                    
Temples Florida's best eating orange                    
Honey Tangerines Rich red flesh, sweet and juicy                    
Valencia Orange Loaded with juice, usually seedless                    

For availability of other crops (berries, vegetables, etc.)  in Florida, click here!

 

The map below shows the main areas of Florida where citrus are grown commercially.

The production of citrus in Florida has been steadily declining since 2000. Florida accounts for 56 percent of total United States citrus production, while California totals 41 percent, and Texas and Arizona combined produced the remaining 3 percent.

The top 5 citrus producing counties were Polk (16.8 million boxes), Hendry (15.8 million boxes), De Soto (13.7 million boxes), Highlands (12.7 million boxes), and Hardee (10.1 million boxes). Together they account for 61 percent of the State's total citrus production

Florida primary citrus growing areas

For more information about citrus, look here:

Pick your own farms in Florida

Other information:

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